Sustainable Development

More and more rural neighborhoods in Durham are being affected by rezoning rules from the City Council which allow for more housing, without considering the impact on traffic or low- and fixed-income residents.

In February 2021, we stood up in front of the City Council against a proposed rezoning for up to 320 homes, in a plot of land adjacent to our community, connected to Cheek Road. You can see the meeting here.

We won that battle, but new and similar challenges will probably come again as developers continue to buy land and build homes for $200,000 and up across Durham.

Although we at Merrick-Moore assume that development is going to happen —especially in a city that attracts 13 new residents per day, according to estimates—, we are aware of development options that are more respectful with rural and low-density areas. One example would be conservation subdivisions, a type of land allotment that’s intended to provide flexibility of design in order to promote environmentally sensitive and efficient uses of the land,” according to Durham’s Unified Development Ordinance.

We are looking into avenues to protect this community from the negative effects of housing inflation. It is important that we grow our membership so that we will be able to achieve goals like achieving historic designation or developing a community land trust.

Fighting development

Merrick-Moore